museumuesum

THE INTERSECTIONS OF ABSTRACTION, TEXT & LANGUAGE, POST-MODERNIST AESTHETICS, EXPERIMENTAL, PERFORMATIVE, MULTI-MEDIA APPROACHES TO ARTMAKING // ORIGINAL CONTENT SELECTED BY JONATHAN WEISKOPF, BROOKLYN, NY
installation view from the exhibition Younger Than Jesus, 2009, New Museum, New York
(foreground) Chu Yun, This Is XX, 2006, female participant, sleeping pill and bed
(background) Corey Archangel, Photoshop CS: 72 by 110 inches, 300 DPI, RGB square pixels, default gradient ‘Spectrum’, mousedown y=1416 x=1000, mouse up y=208 x=42, 2009
Chu Yun’s work This is XX (2006) utilizes an economy of means to evoke a rich panoply of associations. During the course of the exhibition, a rotating group of paid volunteers will ingest sleeping aids that will allow them to sleep through portions of the museum’s opening hours. As they lie placidly on Chu Yun’s white bed, they are transformed into a piece of living sculpture. The participants, all female, all between the ages of 18 and 40, are less real-life, modern-day Sleeping Beauties than islands of enviable calm. Unperturbed by the frantic pace of contemporary life, or by the exhibition around them, they seem to exist in a charmed atmosphere. There is an inherent irony in the participants’ supernatural tranquility: that they are only able to maintain their state of sleep with the assistance of sleeping aids, suggests that, perhaps, their state is not one of relaxation, but of withdrawal and extreme vulnerability. Provocative, and slightly sensational, This is XX not only brings up questions concerning the role of the female body in the history of art, but larger ones that ponder the role of the museum as a platform for self display. Further more, in the context of this exhibition, This is XX can be read as a counterpoint to, or even a protest against, the stereotyping of this generation as hyperactive and hyper-aware.
The title of Corey Archangel’s piece describes the specifications for producing the work in Adobe Photoshop. Though the gesture of naming an artwork after the method of its construction has roots in conceptual artists like Sol LeWitt, who provided museums with instructions for making his drawings rather than producing the works himself, and Lawrence Weiner, who equated linguistic facts with manifested art works, the recent availability of digital imaging software such as Adobe Photoshop has made the lines between production and consumption, high and low, creation and distribution seem less stable than ever. Arcangel’s confusion of “instruction” and “object” is compounded by his use of code, which often involves following the instructions of a prior programmer or software designer, if only to be at cross-purposes with a software’s (or hardware’s) intended application.

installation view from the exhibition Younger Than Jesus, 2009, New Museum, New York

(foreground) Chu Yun, This Is XX, 2006, female participant, sleeping pill and bed

(background) Corey Archangel, Photoshop CS: 72 by 110 inches, 300 DPI, RGB square pixels, default gradient ‘Spectrum’, mousedown y=1416 x=1000, mouse up y=208 x=42, 2009

Chu Yun’s work This is XX (2006) utilizes an economy of means to evoke a rich panoply of associations. During the course of the exhibition, a rotating group of paid volunteers will ingest sleeping aids that will allow them to sleep through portions of the museum’s opening hours. As they lie placidly on Chu Yun’s white bed, they are transformed into a piece of living sculpture. The participants, all female, all between the ages of 18 and 40, are less real-life, modern-day Sleeping Beauties than islands of enviable calm. Unperturbed by the frantic pace of contemporary life, or by the exhibition around them, they seem to exist in a charmed atmosphere. There is an inherent irony in the participants’ supernatural tranquility: that they are only able to maintain their state of sleep with the assistance of sleeping aids, suggests that, perhaps, their state is not one of relaxation, but of withdrawal and extreme vulnerability. Provocative, and slightly sensational, This is XX not only brings up questions concerning the role of the female body in the history of art, but larger ones that ponder the role of the museum as a platform for self display. Further more, in the context of this exhibition, This is XX can be read as a counterpoint to, or even a protest against, the stereotyping of this generation as hyperactive and hyper-aware.

The title of Corey Archangel’s piece describes the specifications for producing the work in Adobe Photoshop. Though the gesture of naming an artwork after the method of its construction has roots in conceptual artists like Sol LeWitt, who provided museums with instructions for making his drawings rather than producing the works himself, and Lawrence Weiner, who equated linguistic facts with manifested art works, the recent availability of digital imaging software such as Adobe Photoshop has made the lines between production and consumption, high and low, creation and distribution seem less stable than ever. Arcangel’s confusion of “instruction” and “object” is compounded by his use of code, which often involves following the instructions of a prior programmer or software designer, if only to be at cross-purposes with a software’s (or hardware’s) intended application.

  1. in-cult reblogged this from thefakeoriginal
  2. 4xm reblogged this from thefakeoriginal
  3. joshuatb reblogged this from thefakeoriginal
  4. jaunehomme reblogged this from thefakeoriginal
  5. cameronjaymurray reblogged this from thefakeoriginal
  6. saltbaths reblogged this from thefakeoriginal
  7. emilie-anderson reblogged this from thefakeoriginal
  8. thefakeoriginal reblogged this from museumuesum
  9. untitledstream reblogged this from museumuesum
  10. sfeeneyrustlife reblogged this from museumuesum and added:
    When I went to see this exhibit I am pretty sure I thought the sleeping girl was a sculpted form.
  11. shupface reblogged this from museumuesum and added:
    This is XX - Chu Yun
  12. arthuur reblogged this from museumuesum
  13. thatshouldbemine reblogged this from museumuesum
  14. sisifo reblogged this from museumuesum