museumuesum

THE INTERSECTIONS OF ABSTRACTION, TEXT & LANGUAGE, POST-MODERNIST AESTHETICS, EXPERIMENTAL, PERFORMATIVE, MULTI-MEDIA APPROACHES TO ARTMAKING // ORIGINAL CONTENT SELECTED BY JONATHAN WEISKOPF, BROOKLYN, NY

Josiah McElheny

Twentieth Century Modernism, Mirrored and Reflected Infinitely, 2006

Hand blown mirrored glass, display structure, transparent mirror and electric lighting, 31 1/4 x 188 x 18 3/4 inches

(Source: museumuesum)

Roy Lichtenstein
Cold Shoulder, 1963
Oil and Magna on canvas, 68 1/2 x 48 in.

Roy Lichtenstein

Cold Shoulder, 1963

Oil and Magna on canvas, 68 1/2 x 48 in.

Henri Matisse

Conversation, 1908-1912
Oil on canvas, 177 x 217 cm
"Conversation", painted in the artist’s country house in the summer of 1909, is one of the important works Matisse produced during the highly productive period 1908-1913. Only slightly smaller than "The Red Room", the images are simplified, minimalized. The central figures of Matisse and his wife Amelie are schematic, while still retaining a portrait likeness. Most importantly, whilst depicting a moment in real life, Matisse "captures the truer and more profound meaning behind it, which serves the artist as a point of departure for a more consistent interpretation of reality," as he himself wrote in 1908. We enter into the blue world of the "Conversation", sink deep into the atmosphere of colour. The blue colour does not represent solidity; this is not the colour of the carpet or the colour of the wall. Filling a large part of the painting space, the blue bears the concept of space through the force of the associations it gives rise to. It is cold; it is emotional and significant; it excites us with its profundity. Submitting to the blue’s dominance, the green becomes not only the colour of the meadow but a symbol of the earth, a symbol of Life, an image which is reinforced by the straight, strong trunk of "the tree of life". In this ideal world of pure light-colour we find two figure-symbols embodying the two eternal sources of Life. In the contrast and mutual attraction of the straight lines (male) and the soft, emotional, lines curving (female) lies one of the mysteries of existence.

Henri Matisse

Conversation, 1908-1912

Oil on canvas, 177 x 217 cm

"Conversation", painted in the artist’s country house in the summer of 1909, is one of the important works Matisse produced during the highly productive period 1908-1913. Only slightly smaller than "The Red Room", the images are simplified, minimalized. The central figures of Matisse and his wife Amelie are schematic, while still retaining a portrait likeness. Most importantly, whilst depicting a moment in real life, Matisse "captures the truer and more profound meaning behind it, which serves the artist as a point of departure for a more consistent interpretation of reality," as he himself wrote in 1908. We enter into the blue world of the "Conversation", sink deep into the atmosphere of colour. The blue colour does not represent solidity; this is not the colour of the carpet or the colour of the wall. Filling a large part of the painting space, the blue bears the concept of space through the force of the associations it gives rise to. It is cold; it is emotional and significant; it excites us with its profundity. Submitting to the blue’s dominance, the green becomes not only the colour of the meadow but a symbol of the earth, a symbol of Life, an image which is reinforced by the straight, strong trunk of "the tree of life". In this ideal world of pure light-colour we find two figure-symbols embodying the two eternal sources of Life. In the contrast and mutual attraction of the straight lines (male) and the soft, emotional, lines curving (female) lies one of the mysteries of existence.

JOAQUIM PLA JANINI
Manana de Sol (Sunny Morning), 1936
bromoil transfer on paper, 41 x 30 cm

JOAQUIM PLA JANINI

Manana de Sol (Sunny Morning), 1936

bromoil transfer on paper, 41 x 30 cm

Mark Rothko
No. 12 (Black on Dark Sienna on Purple), 1960
Oil on canvas, 120 1/8 x 105 1/4 in

Mark Rothko

No. 12 (Black on Dark Sienna on Purple), 1960

Oil on canvas, 120 1/8 x 105 1/4 in


Pak Sheung Cheun
Peanut on Left and Right, 2005
1kg of peanuts, places on 2 areas, 2 x 2 meters

Pak Sheung Cheun

Peanut on Left and Right, 2005

1kg of peanuts, places on 2 areas, 2 x 2 meters


Albert Renger-Patzsch

Gohnender Pavian, c. 1928
gelatin silver print, 22.2 x 16.9 cm (8 3/4 x 6 5/8 in.

Albert Renger-Patzsch

Gohnender Pavian, c. 1928

gelatin silver print, 22.2 x 16.9 cm (8 3/4 x 6 5/8 in.

Brent Wadden

Alignment, from the exhibition About Time, 2013

hand woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas

(Source: museumuesum)

Zhang Huan

To Raise the Water Level in a Fishpond, 1997

Performance, Beijing, China

I invited about forty participants, recent migrants to the city who had come to work in Beijing from other parts of China. They were construction workers, fishermen and labourers, all from the bottom of society. They stood around in the pond and then I walked in it. At first, they stood in a line in the middle to separate the pond into two parts. Then they all walked freely, until the point of the performance arrived, which was to raise the water level. Then they stood still. In the Chinese tradition, fish is the symbol of sex while water is the source of life. This work expresses, in fact, one kind of understanding and explanation of water. That the water in the pond was raised one metre higher is an action of no avail.

(Source: museumuesum)