museumuesum

THE INTERSECTIONS OF ABSTRACTION, TEXT & LANGUAGE, POST-MODERNIST AESTHETICS, EXPERIMENTAL, PERFORMATIVE, MULTI-MEDIA APPROACHES TO ARTMAKING // ORIGINAL CONTENT SELECTED BY JONATHAN WEISKOPF, BROOKLYN, NY
Scott Reeder
312-718-9800, 2013
White neon, wiring, mounting hardware, 7 x 48 inches

Scott Reeder

312-718-9800, 2013

White neon, wiring, mounting hardware, 7 x 48 inches

Diane Arbus


Headless man, N.Y.C., 1962

gelatin silver print, 20 x 16 inches

Diane Arbus

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG

Signs, 1970
screenprint, 35.2 x 26.7 inches

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG

Signs, 1970

screenprint, 35.2 x 26.7 inches

Georges Rouault

Nude with Raised Arm, 1906

Watercolour, gouache and white, partially pastel on paper, pasted on cardboard, 70.4 x 53.2 cm

Georges Rouault

Nude with Raised Arm, 1906

Watercolour, gouache and white, partially pastel on paper, pasted on cardboard, 70.4 x 53.2 cm


Trevor Paglen
Nine Reconnaissance Satellites over the Sonora Pass, 2008
c-print, 48 x 60 inches

Trevor Paglen

Nine Reconnaissance Satellites over the Sonora Pass, 2008

c-print, 48 x 60 inches

CALLUM INNES

Exposed Painting Dioxazine Violet, Mars Black, 2005
Oil on canvas, 95 1/2 × 93 1/8 in.
Innes makes work in a number of different ways, all of which are gradually evolving. The shifts that appear from one series to the next are rarely dramatic, but each new painting builds on those that have gone before in a subtle but constant progression. His characteristic form of coolly atmospheric abstraction has aptly been described as ‘unpainting’, given that key compositional elements are generally produced, not by the application of paint, but through its removal by washes of turpentine. Each finished painting thus suggests a freezing in time of the otherwise momentary arrest of an ongoing process. The play between the additive and subtractive process, the making and unmaking, underlies this sophisticated body of work.

CALLUM INNES

Exposed Painting Dioxazine Violet, Mars Black, 2005

Oil on canvas, 95 1/2 × 93 1/8 in.

Innes makes work in a number of different ways, all of which are gradually evolving. The shifts that appear from one series to the next are rarely dramatic, but each new painting builds on those that have gone before in a subtle but constant progression. His characteristic form of coolly atmospheric abstraction has aptly been described as ‘unpainting’, given that key compositional elements are generally produced, not by the application of paint, but through its removal by washes of turpentine. Each finished painting thus suggests a freezing in time of the otherwise momentary arrest of an ongoing process. The play between the additive and subtractive process, the making and unmaking, underlies this sophisticated body of work.

Alfred Stieglitz

Equivalent, 1925-27, 1929

Gelatin silver prints, approx. 4 5/8 x 3 5/8 inches

(Source: museumuesum)

Jennifer & Kevin McCoy

Every Shot, Every Episode, 2001

277 DVDs with sound, carrying case, and LCD monitor

The source material for this work is a collection of 10,000 shots from Starsky & Hutch. Each episode is broken down into a series of individual shots. The artists have assigned key words to each shot: every plaid, every sexy outfit, every yellow Volkswagen, etc. There are 278 categories in total. Each category is archived on an individual video CD which is labelled in clear, bold lettering and installed in the gallery on a shelf. Video CDs are chosen by the gallery visitor and played via the built-in video screen.

(Source: museumuesum)