museumuesum

THE INTERSECTIONS OF ABSTRACTION, TEXT & LANGUAGE, POST-MODERNIST AESTHETICS, EXPERIMENTAL, PERFORMATIVE, MULTI-MEDIA APPROACHES TO ARTMAKING // ORIGINAL CONTENT SELECTED BY JONATHAN WEISKOPF, BOSTON, MA.

Glenn Ligon

Untitled (I’m Turning into a Specter before Your Very Eyes and I’m Going to Haunt You), 1992, Oil stick, gesso, and graphite on canvas, 80 1/8 x 32 1/8 x 2 in.

Prisoner of Love Edition 1, 1992, Oil and gesso on linen, 80 x 30 x 1 3/4 in.

Untitled (Passing), 1991, Oil stick, gesso and graphite on canvas, 80 x 30 in.

Untitled (I Lost My Voice I Found My Voice), 1991, Oil stick, gesso and graphite on canvas, 80 x 30 in.

Untitled (Wrong Nigga To Fuck With), 1991, Oil stick, gesso and graphite on canvas, 80 x 30 in.

Untitled (I Remember the Very Day That I Became Colored), 1990, Oil stick, gesso, and graphite on wood, 80 × 30 in.

(Source: museumuesum)

Josip Vanista
Silver Line Text, 2009 (text from 1961)
acrylic on canvas, 140 x 180 cm

Josip Vanista

Silver Line Text, 2009 (text from 1961)

acrylic on canvas, 140 x 180 cm

Phil Collins

He who laughs last laughs longest, 2006

35mm film/video, duration 7 minutes

'The work, created to mark the 80th anniversary of the birth of television, touches upon ideas concerning audience participation and their status within broadcast media whilst focusing on the struggle to sustain one of the most primitive and deceptive forms of communication.' Phil Collins, June 2006
Phil Collins’s film he who laughs last laughs longest is shot over the summer of 2006 at an event organised by the artist to find the person who could laugh continuously for the longest duration. he who laughs last laughs longest focuses on participants struggle to sustain their laughter for a cash-prize.

(Source: museumuesum)

Scott Burton
Pastoral Chair Tableau, 1971-1974
Installation view at Artists Space, 1975

Scott Burton

Pastoral Chair Tableau, 1971-1974

Installation view at Artists Space, 1975

Fiona Banner

Pinstripe Wall Drawing, 2014

graphite on wall, variable dimensions, gelatin silver prints, 30.8 x 39.6 cm

(Source: museumuesum)

JANELLE IGLESIAS

bridge and tunnel kids have more fun (The Return of La Morena),” 2011

sculpture with scavenged materials, 8 x 5 x 8 feet
sculpture with scavenged materials, 8 x 5 x 8 feet

sculpture with scavenged materials, 8 x 5 x 8 feet

Bamboo shades are deconstructed and made into long streamers that weave through a construction of scavenged furniture parts, musical instruments, pallets, crates and objects. Painted La Morena cans inhabit the installation, spinning on toy record players. While relatively still and silent, the piece operates like a musical composition in space.

(Source: museumuesum)

SPENCER FINCH

Trying to Remember the Color of the Sky on That September Morning, 2014

watercolor on paper, 2,983 individual squares

Installed at National September 11 Memorial and Museum, New York City

(Source: museumuesum)

Phillip Toledano

from the series Kim Jong Phil, 2011

I insist, ladies first, Oil on canvas, 30 x 40 inches

I’ll be back for the dog, Oil on canvas, 30 x 40 inches

You have so much to learn, and I have so much to give, Oil on canvas, 50 x 60 inches

International world global domination, Oil on canvas, 40x50 inches

It’s true. I’m utterly fascinating, Oil on canvas, 30 x 40 inches

His royal equestrian majesty, Oil on canvas, 30 x 40 inches

A sporting chance, Oil on canvas, 30 x 40 inches

Love oils the cogs of revolution, Oil on canvas, 30 x 40 inches

I love the smell of adulation in the morning, Oil on canvas, 20 x 30 inches

Mr Toledano as Saddam Hussein, Bronze, 20 inches

I think a great deal about what it means to be an artist.

I reflect on the elaborate psychological mechanisms required to pursue something so elusive, so ambiguous. I often wonder: ‘Am I talking to myself?’

I don’t make work for other people, but as an artist, I need to be in dialogue with the world that exists beyond my overpopulated cranium. I’ve concluded that to be effective-to be functional-I must guzzle an eye-popping cocktail of delusion and narcissism.

It occurred to me that being an artist is a great deal like being a dictator.

Just like a dictator, I must live in a closed loop of self-delusion. A place where my words and ideas always ring true. A gilded daydream of grandiosity. There can be no room for doubt. I must be convinced that I have something vital to say. I must believe that the world is waiting in keen anticipation to hear my message.

For my palette, I’ve copied pre-existing dictatorial art. Paintings from North Korea, statues of assorted dictators (Kim Il Sung, Laurent Kabilla, and Saddam Hussein). I had these works re-created in China, and each instance, I’ve replaced the great leaders with myself.

Phillip Toledano, 2011

(Source: museumuesum)

Sue Williams

Mike and Zbigniew, 2012
Oil and acrylic on canvas, 70 x 70 inches

Suspicious bird, gigantic bush, 2012
Oil and acrylic on canvas, 60 x 60 inches

(Source: museumuesum)

Marlene Dumas

The Blindfolded Man, 2007

Oil on canvas, 39 3/8 x 35 2/5 inches

Marlene Dumas

The Blindfolded Man, 2007

Oil on canvas, 39 3/8 x 35 2/5 inches

On Kawara
SEPT. 9, 1990, 1990
acrylic on canvas, 13 x 17 inches

On Kawara

SEPT. 9, 1990, 1990

acrylic on canvas, 13 x 17 inches